NeuroPsyche

Bureaucracy, Education, NeuroPsyche

Six (6) *brief* news alerts for independent mental health: MindFreedom International News – 12 December 2009

These “inconvenient truth” brain damage medical studies — confirmed
by repeated animal studies, brain scans and autopsies — are now well
known throughout the medical field, but are almost never explained to
the general public, who are often the ones to pay for these expensive
prescriptions.

Bureaucracy, Education, NeuroPsyche

Op Ed: Choice in Mental Health is a Human Right (Mind Freedom International)

Many of the
medications currently provided are typically associated with
significant medical risk, are often experienced as subjectively
harmful, and their long-term effectiveness remains controversial.
Furthermore, there are widely researched psychosocial alternative
treatments likely to be at least as effective for many, with fewer
harmful effects.” …

NeuroPsyche, Pharmacogenetics

Psychopharmacology: Atypical Antipsychotic Dosing: The Effect of Smoking and Caffeine

The width of the therapeutic window determines the clinical
significance of the plasma level changes associated with smoking
and caffeine intake. Compared with olanzapine, clozapine has a
much narrower therapeutic window. Several of clozapine’s side effects
are dose related: plasma levels higher than 1,000 ng per milliliter
have been associated with toxicity, including seizure risk and severe
sedation. …

Implications, Metabolics, NeuroPsyche, Toxicology

‘Massive’ weight gain in kids on atypicals (FiercePharma)

The study has several implications. One, it’s more evidence that the atypicals,
once considered vastly superior to first-generation antipsychotics because of a
“favorable” side-effect profile, may not be that much better, just different.
Rather than risking tardive dyskinesia and akathisia as patients using first-gen
antipsychotics are, patients on atypicals risk major weight gain and metabolic
changes. …

Education, NeuroPsyche

Smoking, High Blood Pressure, and Diabetes May Lead to Dementia (From Medscape Medical News CME)

Previous research suggests that traditional cardiovascular risk factors may be
independent predictors of dementia, but this evidence is counterbalanced by
research findings that controlling chronic illness, such as maintenance of
normal blood pressure levels among older adults with hypertension, fails to
reduce the risk for dementia. The current study examines a large cohort of
adults followed up for more than a decade to better understand the relationship
between cardiovascular risk factors and the incidence of dementia. …